Periodontal Disease

What is Periodontal Disease?

Periodontal treatment is necessary when various conditions affect the health of your gums and the regions of your jaw bone that hold your teeth in place. Retaining your teeth is dependent on proper periodontal care and maintenance. Healthy gums enhance the appearance of your teeth, like a frame around a beautiful painting. When your gums become unhealthy, they can either recede or become swollen and red. In later stages, the supporting bone is destroyed and your teeth will shift, loosen, or fall out. These changes not only affect your ability to chew and speak, they also affect your smile.

Periodontal disease is an ongoing infection of the gums that gradually destroys the support of your natural teeth. Periodontal disease affects one or more of the periodontal tissues: alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, cementum, or gingiva. While there are many diseases which affect the tooth-supporting structures, plaque-induced inflammatory lesions are the cause of the majority of periodontal issues, and are divided into two categories: gingivitis and periodontitis. 

Dental plaque is the primary cause of gingivitis. Plaque is a sticky film, composed primarily of bacteria which adhere to your teeth at and below the gum line. Plaque constantly forms on your teeth, even minutes after cleaning. Bacteria found in plaque produce toxins or poisons that irritate the gums. Gums may become inflamed, red, swollen, and bleed easily. If this irritation is prolonged, the gums separate from the teeth causing pockets (spaces) to form. If daily brushing and flossing is neglected, plaque can also harden into a rough, porous substance known as calculus (or tartar). This can occur both above and below the gum line.

If gingivitis progresses into periodontitis, the supporting gum tissue and bone that holds teeth in place deteriorates. The progressive loss of this bone can lead to loosening and subsequent loss of teeth. Periodontitis is caused by bacteria that adhere to the tooth’s surface, along with an overly aggressive immune response to these bacteria.

Periodontal disease is dangerous in that it is often painless and symptomless. 64.7 million Americans have some form of periodontal disease, or nearly 50% of American adults. It is important to maintain proper home oral care and regular dentist visits to reduce the risk of obtaining this disease.  More information about periodontal disease can be found on the American Academy of Periodontology website.


Periodontics Overview

For a brief narrated overview of the periodontics, please click the image below. It will launch our flash educational MiniModule in a separate window that may answer some of your questions about periodontics.

Periodontics Overview

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